Double vision: the ambivalent imagery of drunkenness in early modern Europe

Nichols, T. (2014) Double vision: the ambivalent imagery of drunkenness in early modern Europe. Past and Present, 222(Sup 9), pp. 146-167.

Nichols, T. (2014) Double vision: the ambivalent imagery of drunkenness in early modern Europe. Past and Present, 222(Sup 9), pp. 146-167.

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Abstract

This article discusses two superficially opposed visual traditions showing drinking and drunkenness in sixteenth and seventeenth century visual art. Rather than contrasting an ideal southern European Catholic mode with a satirical northern and Protestant alternative, it seeks a more sustainable interpretation, in which positive and negative meanings are seen as mutually supportive: as necessary terms within a wider and fundamentally undecided cultural discourse.

Item Type:Articles (Other)
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Nichols, Dr Tom
Authors: Nichols, T.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Culture and Creative Arts > History of Art
Journal Name:Past and Present
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0031-2746
ISSN (Online):1477-464X

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