Universal credit, ubiquitous conditionality and its implications for social citizenship

Dwyer, P. and Wright, S. (2014) Universal credit, ubiquitous conditionality and its implications for social citizenship. Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 22(1), pp. 27-35. (doi:10.1332/175982714X13875305151043)

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Abstract

Between 2013 and 2017 Universal Credit replaces six means-tested working age benefits. Backed by a punitive system of tiered sanctions and fines, Universal Credit represents a major expansion and intensification of personalised behavioural conditionality and indicates the ubiquity of conditionality at the heart of twenty-first century UK social citizenship.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Wright, Dr Sharon
Authors: Dwyer, P., and Wright, S.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
Journal Name:Journal of Poverty and Social Justice
Publisher:Policy Press
ISSN:1759-8273
ISSN (Online):1759-8281

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