Increasing adherence to obstructive sleep apnea treatment with a group social cognitive therapy treatment intervention: a randomized trial

Bartlett, D., Wong, K., Richards, D., Moy, E., Espie, C.A., Cistulli, P.A. and Grunstein, R. (2013) Increasing adherence to obstructive sleep apnea treatment with a group social cognitive therapy treatment intervention: a randomized trial. Sleep, 36(11), pp. 1647-1654. (doi: 10.5665/sleep.3118)

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Abstract

Objective: To examine whether a social cognitive therapy (SCT) intervention increases continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use compared to equivalent social interaction (SI) time.<p></p> Participants: Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) referred for CPAP therapy.<p></p> Intervention: Participants received a 30-min group education session regarding OSA and CPAP. Groups of three to four participants were then randomly assigned to an SCT session or social interaction.<p></p> Measurements: CPAP usage was assessed at 7 nights, then 1, 3, and 6 months. The two primary outcomes were adherence, usage ≥ 4 h per night at 6 months, and uptake of CPAP. Questionnaires were given pretreatment and posttreatment.<p></p> Results: Two hundred six individuals were randomized to SI (n = 97) or SCT (n = 109). CPAP uptake was not different between groups (82% in SI, 88% in SCT groups, P = 0.35). There were no differences between groups in adherence: 63-66% at 1 week, and at 6 months 55-47% (P = 0.36). Higher pretreatment apnea-hypopnea index, higher baseline self-efficacy, and use of CPAP (≥ 4 h) at 1 week were independent predictors of CPAP adherence at 6 months. CPAP adherence increased by a factor of 1.8 (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.0) for every one-unit increase in self-efficacy. There was no difference between groups postintervention in self-efficacy scores, sleepiness, mood, or sleep quality.<p></p> Conclusions: In this randomized trial, a single SCT application did not increase adherence when compared with SI time. Although self-efficacy scores prior to CPAP predicted adherence, self-efficacy was not increased by the interventions. Increasing intensity and understanding of SCT interventions may be needed to improve CPAP adherence.<p></p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Espie, Professor Colin
Authors: Bartlett, D., Wong, K., Richards, D., Moy, E., Espie, C.A., Cistulli, P.A., and Grunstein, R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Sleep
ISSN:0161-8105
ISSN (Online):1550-9109

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