Gender differences in lung cancer risk by smoking: a multicentre case-control study in Germany and Italy

Kreuzer, M. et al. (2000) Gender differences in lung cancer risk by smoking: a multicentre case-control study in Germany and Italy. British Journal of Cancer, 82(1), pp. 227-233. (doi:10.1054/bjoc.1999.0904)

Kreuzer, M. et al. (2000) Gender differences in lung cancer risk by smoking: a multicentre case-control study in Germany and Italy. British Journal of Cancer, 82(1), pp. 227-233. (doi:10.1054/bjoc.1999.0904)

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Abstract

Several studies in the past have shown appreciably higher lung cancer risk estimates associated with smoking exposure among men than among women, while more recent studies in the USA report just the opposite. To evaluate this topic in a European population we conducted a case-control study of lung cancer in three German and three Italian centres. Personal interviews and standardized questionnaires were used to obtain detailed life-long smoking and occupational histories from 3723 male and 900 female cases and 4075 male and 1094 female controls. Lung cancer risk comparing ever-smokers with never-smokers was higher among men (odds ratios (OR) adjusted for age and centre = 16.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 12.8-20.3) than among women (OR = 4.2, CI 3.5-5.1). Because the smoking habits of women were different from men, we conducted more detailed analyses using comparable levels of smoking exposure. After restriction to smokers and adjustment for other smoking variables, risk estimates did not differ appreciably between genders. The analysis of duration of smoking (0-19, 20-39, 40+ years) adjusted for cigarette consumption and time since quitting smoking revealed similar risk estimates in men (OR = 1.0, 3.3 [CI 2.6-4.2], 4.1 [CI 3.1-5.6]) and women (OR = 1.0, 2.7 [CI 1.7-4.1], 3.3 [CI 1.9-5.8]). The same was true of the analysis of average or cumulative smoking consumption, and also of analyses stratified by different histological types. We conclude that for comparable exposure to tobacco smoke, the risk of lung cancer is comparable in women and men.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Whitley, Dr Elise
Authors: Kreuzer, M., Boffetta, P., Whitley, E., Ahrens, W., Gaborieau, V., Heinrich, J., Jöckel, K.H., Kreienbrock, L., Mallone, S., Merletti, F., Roesch, F., Zambon, P., and Simonato, L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
Journal Name:British Journal of Cancer
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0007-0920
ISSN (Online):1532-1827
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign
First Published:First published in British Journal of Cancer 82(1):227-233
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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