'All in it together'? Social cohesion in a dividing society: attitudes to income inequality and redistribution in a residential context

Kearns, A., Bailey, N., Gannon, M., Livingston, M. and Leyland, A. (2014) 'All in it together'? Social cohesion in a dividing society: attitudes to income inequality and redistribution in a residential context. Journal of Social Policy, 43(3), pp. 453-477. (doi:10.1017/S0047279414000063)

[img]
Preview
Text
87308.pdf - Accepted Version

579kB

Abstract

This paper asks whether where someone lives bears any association with their attitudes to inequality and income redistribution, focusing on the relative contribution of neighbourhood income, density and ethnic composition. People on higher incomes showed higher support for redistribution when living in more deprived neighbourhoods. People with lower levels of altruism had higher levels of support for redistribution in neighbourhoods of higher density. People living in more ethnically mixed neighbourhoods had higher levels of support for redistribution on average, but this support declined for Whites with low levels of altruism as the deprivation of the neighbourhood increased. Current trends which sustain or extend income and wealth inequalities, reflected in patterns of residence, may undermine social cohesion in the medium- to long-term. This may be offset to some extent by trends of rising residential ethnic diversity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Bailey, Professor Nick and Kearns, Professor Ade and Gannon, Ms Maria and Livingston, Dr Mark and Leyland, Professor Alastair
Authors: Kearns, A., Bailey, N., Gannon, M., Livingston, M., and Leyland, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
Journal Name:Journal of Social Policy
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0047-2794
ISSN (Online):1469-7823
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 Cambridge University Press
First Published:First published in Journal of Social Policy 43(3):453-477
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
535501The impact of neighbourhood context on attitudes to inequality and redistributionNick BaileyEconomic & Social Research Council (ESRC)RES-000-22-4192SPS - URBAN STUDIES