The envirome and the connectome: exploring the structural noise in the human brain associated with socioeconomic deprivation

Krishnadas, R. , Kim, J., Mclean, J., Batty, D., Mclean, J., Millar, K., Packard, C. and Cavanagh, J. (2013) The envirome and the connectome: exploring the structural noise in the human brain associated with socioeconomic deprivation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7(722), (doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00722)

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Abstract

Complex cognitive functions are widely recognized to be the result of a number of brain regions working together as large-scale networks. Recently, complex network analysis has been used to characterize various structural properties of the large scale network organization of the brain. For example, the human brain has been found to have a modular architecture i.e. regions within the network form communities (modules) with more connections between regions within the community compared to regions outside it. The aim of this study was to examine the modular and overlapping modular architecture of the brain networks using complex network analysis. We also examined the association between neighborhood level deprivation and brain network structure – modularity and grey nodes. We compared network structure derived from anatomical MRI scans of 42 middle-aged neurologically healthy men from the least (LD) and the most deprived (MD) neighborhoods of Glasgow with their corresponding random networks. Cortical morphological covariance networks were constructed from the cortical thickness derived from the MRI scans of the brain. For a given modularity threshold, networks derived from the MD group showed similar number of modules compared to their corresponding random networks, while networks derived from the LD group had more modules compared to their corresponding random networks. The MD group also had fewer grey nodes – a measure of overlapping modular structure. These results suggest that apparent structural difference in brain networks may be driven by differences in cortical thicknesses between groups. This demonstrates a structural organization that is consistent with a system that is less robust and less efficient in information processing. These findings provide some evidence of the relationship between socioeconomic deprivation and brain network topology.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Batty, Mr David and Kim, Dr Jongrae and Mclean, Dr John and Krishnadas, Dr Rajeev and Cavanagh, Professor Jonathan and Millar, Professor Keith and Packard, Professor Chris
Authors: Krishnadas, R., Kim, J., Mclean, J., Batty, D., Mclean, J., Millar, K., Packard, C., and Cavanagh, J.
Subjects:H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1662-5161
ISSN (Online):1662-5161
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 The Authors
First Published:First published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7(722)
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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