Distinct patterns of functional brain connectivity correlate with objective performance and subjective beliefs

Barttfeld, P., Wicker, B., McAleer, P. , Belin, P., Cojan, Y., Graziano, M., Leiguarda, R. and Sigman, M. (2013) Distinct patterns of functional brain connectivity correlate with objective performance and subjective beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(28), pp. 11577-11582. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1301353110)

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Abstract

The degree of correspondence between objective performance and subjective beliefs varies widely across individuals. Here we demonstrate that functional brain network connectivity measured before exposure to a perceptual decision task covaries with individual objective (type-I performance) and subjective (type-II performance) accuracy. Increases in connectivity with type-II performance were observed in networks measured while participants directed attention inward (focus on respiration), but not in networks measured during states of neutral (resting state) or exogenous attention. Measures of type-I performance were less sensitive to the subjects’ specific attentional states from which the networks were derived. These results suggest the existence of functional brain networks indexing objective performance and accuracy of subjective beliefs distinctively expressed in a set of stable mental states.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McAleer, Dr Philip and Belin, Professor Pascal
Authors: Barttfeld, P., Wicker, B., McAleer, P., Belin, P., Cojan, Y., Graziano, M., Leiguarda, R., and Sigman, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
Journal Name:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
ISSN:0027-8424
ISSN (Online):1091-6490

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