Biotechnological war against biofilms. Could phages mean the end of device-related infections?

Del Pozo, J.L., Alonso, M., Arciola, C.R., Gonzalez, R., Leiva, J., Lasa, I. and Penades, J.R. (2007) Biotechnological war against biofilms. Could phages mean the end of device-related infections? International Journal of Artificial Organs, 30(9), pp. 805-812.

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Microorganisms universally attach to surfaces, resulting in biofilm formation. These biofilms entail a serious problem in daily clinical practice because of the great prevalence of implantable device-related infections. Differences in antibiotic activity against planktonic and sessile bacteria may relate to clinical failures in the treatment of biofilm-related infections (BRI). Bacteriophages have several characteristics that make them potentially attractive therapeutic agents in some selected clinical settings, like for example BRI. They are highly specific and very effective in lysing targeted bacteria, moreover, they appear to be safe for humans. Many studies have shown the potential of phages for the treatment of infectious diseases in plants and animals, including infections with highly drug-resistant bacteria. The therapeutic use of bacteriophages, possibly in combination with antibiotics, may be a valuable approach in BRI. However, many important questions still remain that must be addressed before phages can be endorsed for therapeutic use in humans. J. Penades

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Penades, Professor Jose R
Authors: Del Pozo, J.L., Alonso, M., Arciola, C.R., Gonzalez, R., Leiva, J., Lasa, I., and Penades, J.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:International Journal of Artificial Organs
ISSN:0391-3988
ISSN (Online):1724-6040

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record