Practicing the disseminary: technology lessons from Napster

Adam, A.K.M. (2002) Practicing the disseminary: technology lessons from Napster. Teaching Theology and Religion, 5(1), pp. 10-16. (doi:10.1111/1467-9647.00113)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9647.00113

Abstract

Whatever will happen in the way of the confluence of pedagogy and technology, it will not so much perpetuate past models in more efficient ways as it will reflect a stronger element of (for example) the unanticipated success of Napster. The author suggests a fivefold interpretation of Napster's implications as a guideline of what cybermedia do well, and how theological educators can use cybermedia to enrich their classroom teaching by distinguishing online from in-class education. Cybermedia serve best when they do not duplicate or usurp functions best accomplished in person, and personal interaction thrives when not burdened with information-transmission that might as well take place online.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Adam, Dr A K M
Authors: Adam, A.K.M.
Subjects:T Technology > T Technology (General)
L Education > L Education (General)
College/School:College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > Theology and Religious Studies
Journal Name:Teaching Theology and Religion
ISSN:1368-4868
ISSN (Online):1467-9647
Published Online:10 January 2003

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