Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic-inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates

Symes, M.D., Cogdell, R.J. and Cronin, L. (2013) Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic-inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 371(1996), p. 20110411. (doi:10.1098/rsta.2011.0411)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Artificial photosynthesis aims at capturing solar energy and using it to produce storable fuels. However, while there is reason to be optimistic that such approaches can deliver higher energy conversion efficiencies than natural photosynthetic systems, many serious challenges remain to be addressed. Perhaps chief among these is the issue of device stability. Almost all approaches to artificial photosynthesis employ easily oxidized organic molecules as light harvesters or in catalytic centres, frequently in solution with highly oxidizing species. The ‘elephant in the room’ in this regard is that oxidation of these organic moieties is likely to occur at least as rapidly as oxidation of water, meaning that current device performance is severely curtailed. Herein, we discuss one possible solution to this problem: using self-assembling organic–polyoxometalate hybrid structures to produce compartments inside which the individual component reactions of photosynthesis can occur without such a high incidence of deleterious side reactions.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cogdell, Professor Richard and Symes, Dr Mark and Cronin, Professor Leroy
Authors: Symes, M.D., Cogdell, R.J., and Cronin, L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
College of Science and Engineering > School of Chemistry
Journal Name:Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Publisher:Royal Society
ISSN:1364-503X
ISSN (Online):1471-2962

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record