The modified Glasgow prognostic score in prostate cancer: results from a retrospective clinical series of 744 patients

Shafique, K., Proctor, M.J., McMillan, D.C. , Leung, H. , Smith, K., Sloan, B. and Morrison, D.S. (2013) The modified Glasgow prognostic score in prostate cancer: results from a retrospective clinical series of 744 patients. BMC Cancer, 13(292), (doi:10.1186/1471-2407-13-292)

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Abstract

<p>Background: As the incidence of prostate cancer continues to rise steeply, there is an increasing need to identify more accurate prognostic markers for the disease. There is some evidence that a higher modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) may be associated with poorer survival in patients with prostate cancer but it is not known whether this is independent of other established prognostic factors. Therefore the aim of this study was to describe the relationship between mGPS and survival in patients with prostate cancer after adjustment for other prognostic factors.</p> <p>Methods: Retrospective clinical series on patients in Glasgow, Scotland, for whom data from the Scottish Cancer Registry, including Gleason score, Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, six months prior to or following the diagnosis, were included in this study.</p> <p>The mGPS was constructed by combining CRP and albumin. Five-year and ten-year relative survival and relative excess risk of death were estimated by mGPS categories after adjusting for age, socioeconomic circumstances, Gleason score, PSA and previous in-patient bed days.</p> <p>Results: Seven hundred and forty four prostate cancer patients were identified; of these, 497 (66.8%) died during a maximum follow up of 11.9 years. Patients with mGPS of 2 had poorest 5-year and 10-year relative survival, of 32.6% and 18.8%, respectively. Raised mGPS also had a significant association with excess risk of death at five years (mGPS 2: Relative Excess Risk = 3.57, 95% CI 2.31-5.52) and ten years (mGPS 2: Relative Excess Risk = 3.42, 95% CI 2.25-5.21) after adjusting for age, socioeconomic circumstances, Gleason score, PSA and previous in-patient bed days.</p> <p>Conclusions: The mGPS is an independent and objective prognostic indicator for survival of patients with prostate cancer. It may be useful in determining the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer in addition to established prognostic markers.</p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Leung, Professor Hing and Morrison, Dr David and Proctor, Dr Michael and McMillan, Professor Donald and Sloan, Mr Billy and Shafique, Dr Kashif
Authors: Shafique, K., Proctor, M.J., McMillan, D.C., Leung, H., Smith, K., Sloan, B., and Morrison, D.S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
Journal Name:BMC Cancer
Publisher:BioMed Central Ltd.
ISSN:1471-2407
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMC Cancer 13:292
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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