One nation under God: making historical sense of evangelical protestantism in contemporary American politics

Newman, S.P. (2007) One nation under God: making historical sense of evangelical protestantism in contemporary American politics. Journal of American Studies, 41(3), pp. 581-597. (doi:10.1017/S0021875807004008)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021875807004008

Abstract

Commentators noted the role of the religious right in the re-election of President George W. Bush in 2004. This essay suggests that such assessments are ahistorical and flawed, and illustrates the ways in which evangelical Protestantism has shaped American political life. Examples of the intersection of religion and politics include Jefferson's election in 1800, John Brown's trial and execution, Abraham Lincoln's Civil War leadership and William Jennings Bryan's radical democratic politics. The essay concludes by arguing that if American-studies teaching and research marginalizes religion it fails to comprehend a vital component of American society and culture.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Newman, Professor Simon
Authors: Newman, S.P.
Subjects:J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
E History America > E151 United States (General)
College/School:College of Arts > School of Humanities > History
Journal Name:Journal of American Studies
Journal Abbr.:J. Am. stud.
ISSN:0021-8758
ISSN (Online):1469-5154
Published Online:24 October 2007

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