The incidence of mania: time trends in relation to gender and ethnicity

Van Os, J., Takei, N., Castle, D.J., Wessely, S., Der, G. , MacDonald, A.M. and Murray, R.M. (1996) The incidence of mania: time trends in relation to gender and ethnicity. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 31(3-4), pp. 129-136.

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Abstract

In order to investigate conflicting reports about possible changes in the incidence of mania, we established first contact rates for mania in the defined area of Camberwell between 1965 and 1984. There was some evidence for an increase in the first contact rate of mania, especially in females. This rise may be associated with the influx into Camberwell of individuals of Afro-Caribbean origin who showed significantly higher rates than the white group [adjusted rate ratio 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-6.9] and more often displayed mixed manic and schizophrenic symptomatology (risk ratio 2.2; 95% CI 1.1-4.3). We conclude that the incidence of mania has not decreased and may actually have increased. High rates of mental illness among members of ethnic minorities are not specific to schizophrenia, suggesting that a risk factor common to both manic and schizophrenic illness is more prevalent among these groups.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Der, Mr Geoffrey
Authors: Van Os, J., Takei, N., Castle, D.J., Wessely, S., Der, G., MacDonald, A.M., and Murray, R.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
Journal Name:Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
ISSN:0933-7954
ISSN (Online):1433-9285

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