Effects of dietary calcium restriction and acute exercise on the antioxidant enzyme system and oxidative stress in rat diaphragm

Itoh, M., Oh-ishi, S., Hatao, H., Leeuwenburgh, C., Selman, C. , Ohno, H., Kizaki, T., Nakamura, H. and Matsuoka, T. (2004) Effects of dietary calcium restriction and acute exercise on the antioxidant enzyme system and oxidative stress in rat diaphragm. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 287(1), R33-R38. (doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00598.2003)

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Abstract

Calcium deficiency is considered to increase intracellular calcium level; thus the aim of the current study was to elucidate whether dietary calcium restriction enhanced exercise-induced oxidative stress in rat diaphragm. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group subjected to 1 mo of calcium restriction. In addition, each group was subsequently subdivided into rested or acutely exercised group. Dietary calcium restriction significantly (P < 0.05) upregulated the activities of manganese-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) but not catalase. Acute exercise, in addition to calcium restriction, decreased both SOD isoenzymes in the diaphragm of calcium-restricted rats (P < 0.05). On the other hand, calcium restriction resulted in increased Gpx mRNA expression (P < 0.05). In control rats, acute exercise significantly (P < 0.05) increased the expressions of both SOD mRNAs, whereas in the calcium-restricted rats, it increased that of Mn-SOD mRNA (P < 0.05) but decreased that of Gpx mRNA (P < 0.05). Furthermore, reactive carbonyl derivative, a marker of protein oxidation, was significantly greater in the calcium-restricted rats than in the control rats after acute exercise (P < 0.05). The results suggest that antioxidant enzymes in rat diaphragm were upregulated in response to an increased oxidative stress by dietary calcium restriction but that upregulation is not enough to cope with exercise-induced further increase of oxidative stress.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Selman, Professor Colin
Authors: Itoh, M., Oh-ishi, S., Hatao, H., Leeuwenburgh, C., Selman, C., Ohno, H., Kizaki, T., Nakamura, H., and Matsuoka, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0363-6119
ISSN (Online):1522-1490

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