Clinical evaluation of cochlear hearing status in dogs using evoked otoacoustic emissions

Gonçalves, R., McBrearty, A., Pratola, L., Calvo, G., Anderson, T.J. and Penderis, J. (2012) Clinical evaluation of cochlear hearing status in dogs using evoked otoacoustic emissions. Journal of Small Animal Practice, 53(6), pp. 344-351. (doi:10.1111/j.1748-5827.2012.01229.x)

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Abstract

Objectives: Evoked otoacoustic emission testing is the preferred test in human patients for sensorineural deafness screening in neonates and cochlear outer hair cell function monitoring in adults. This study evaluated evoked otoacoustic emission testing for cochlear function assessment in dogs within a clinical setting. Methods: Two populations of anaesthetised dogs were included. In group 1 the evoked otoacoustic emission response was compared to the brainstem auditory evoked response in 10 dogs having hearing assessment. Group 2 comprised 43 presumed normal dogs, in which the suitability of two types of evoked otoacoustic emissions, transient-evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions, were evaluated (brainstem auditory evoked response was not performed in this group). Results: Valid transient-evoked otoacoustic emission and distortion-product otoacoustic emission responses were successfully recorded within the clinical setting and correctly identified deaf and hearing ears. Within presumed healthy dogs, normal otoacoustic emission response was demonstrated in more than 80% of dogs using a single, short distortion-product otoacoustic emission run and in 78% of dogs with valid transient-evoked otoacoustic emission responses using a series of three repeated transient-evoked otoacoustic emission short runs. Clinical Significance: Transient-evoked otoacoustic emission and distortion-product otoacoustic emission testing provided a rapid, non-invasive frequency-specific assessment of cochlear function. Transient-evoked otoacoustic emission and distortion product otoacoustic emission testing is suitable as a screening procedure to detect loss of cochlear function in dogs, although further investigation is needed.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Penderis, Professor Jacques and McBrearty, Mrs Alix and Anderson, Professor Jim and Calvo, Ms Gillian
Authors: Gonçalves, R., McBrearty, A., Pratola, L., Calvo, G., Anderson, T.J., and Penderis, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Journal of Small Animal Practice
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:0022-4510

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