Short-term and long-term outcomes in 133 429 emergency patients admitted with angina or myocardial infarction in Scotland, 1990-2000: population-based cohort study

Capewell, S., Murphy, N.F., MacIntyre, K., Frame, S., Stewart, S., Chalmers, J.W.T., Boyd, J., Finlayson, A., Redpath, A. and McMurray, J.J.V. (2006) Short-term and long-term outcomes in 133 429 emergency patients admitted with angina or myocardial infarction in Scotland, 1990-2000: population-based cohort study. Heart, 92(11), pp. 1563-1570. (doi:10.1136/hrt.2005.085399)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2005.085399

Abstract

Objective: To analyse short- and long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in a large population-based cohort of unselected patients with a first emergency admission for suspected acute coronary syndrome between 1990 and 2000 in Scotland. Methods: All first emergency admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and all first emergency admissions for angina (the proxy for unstable angina) between 1990 and 2000 in Scotland (population 5.1 million) were identified. Survival to five years was examined by Cox multivariate modelling to examine the independent prognostic effects of diagnosis, age, sex, year of admission, socioeconomic deprivation and co-morbidity. Results: In Scotland between 1990 and 2000, 133 429 individual patients had a first emergency admission for suspected acute coronary syndrome: 96 026 with AMI and 37 403 with angina. After exclusion of deaths within 30 days, crude five-year case fatality was similarly poor for patients with angina and those with AMI (23.9% v 21.6% in men and 23.5% v 26.0% in women). The longer-term risk of a subsequent fatal or non-fatal event in the five years after first hospital admission was high: 54% in men after AMI (53% in women) and 56% after angina (49% in women). Event rates increased threefold with increasing age and 20–60% with different co-morbidities, but were 11–34% lower in women. Conclusions: Longer-term case fatality was similarly high in patients with angina and in survivors of AMI, about 5% a year. Furthermore, half the patients experienced a fatal or non-fatal event within five years. These data may strengthen the case for aggressive secondary prevention in all patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MacIntyre, Dr Kate and Capewell, Dr Simon and McMurray, Professor John
Authors: Capewell, S., Murphy, N.F., MacIntyre, K., Frame, S., Stewart, S., Chalmers, J.W.T., Boyd, J., Finlayson, A., Redpath, A., and McMurray, J.J.V.
Subjects:R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Centre for Population and Health Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Heart
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1355-6037
ISSN (Online):1468-201X
Published Online:14 June 2006
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2006 BMJ Publishing Group
First Published:First published in Heart 92(11):1563-1570
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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