Control of human adenovirus type 5 gene expression by cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin-associated complexes

Schreiner, S., Burck, C., Glass, M., Groitl, P., Wimmer, P., Kinkley, S., Mund, A., Everett, R.D. and Dobner, T. (2013) Control of human adenovirus type 5 gene expression by cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin-associated complexes. Nucleic Acids Research, 41(6), pp. 3532-3550. (doi:10.1093/nar/gkt064)

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Abstract

Death domain–associated protein (Daxx) cooperates with X-linked α-thalassaemia retardation syndrome protein (ATRX), a putative member of the sucrose non-fermentable 2 family of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling proteins, acting as the core ATPase subunit in this complex, whereas Daxx is the targeting factor, leading to histone deacetylase recruitment, H3.3 deposition and transcriptional repression of cellular promoters. Despite recent findings on the fundamental importance of chromatin modification in host-cell gene regulation, it remains unclear whether adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) transcription is regulated by cellular chromatin remodelling to allow efficient virus gene expression. Here, we focus on the repressive role of the Daxx/ATRX complex during Ad5 replication, which depends on intact protein–protein interaction, as negative regulation could be relieved with a Daxx mutant that is unable to interact with ATRX. To ensure efficient viral replication, Ad5 E1B-55K protein inhibits Daxx and targets ATRX for proteasomal degradation in cooperation with early region 4 open reading frame protein 6 and cellular components of a cullin-dependent E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our studies illustrate the importance and diversity of viral factors antagonizing Daxx/ATRX-mediated repression of viral gene expression and shed new light on the modulation of cellular chromatin remodelling factors by Ad5. We show for the first time that cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin remodelling complexes play essential roles in Ad gene expression and illustrate the importance of early viral proteins to counteract cellular chromatin remodelling.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Everett, Professor Roger and Glass, Dr Mandy
Authors: Schreiner, S., Burck, C., Glass, M., Groitl, P., Wimmer, P., Kinkley, S., Mund, A., Everett, R.D., and Dobner, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Nucleic Acids Research
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0305-1048
ISSN (Online):1362-4962
Published Online:08 February 2013
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 The Authors
First Published:First published in Nucleic Acids Research 41(6):3532-3550
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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