Switching leukemia cell phenotype between life and death

Tucker, S.J., Rae, C. , Littlejohn, A.F., Paul, A. and MacEwan, D.J. (2004) Switching leukemia cell phenotype between life and death. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 101(35), pp. 12940-12945. (doi: 10.1073/pnas.0400949101)

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Abstract

Divergent life or death responses of a cell can be controlled by a single cytokine (tumor necrosis factor α, TNF) via the signaling pathways that respond to activation of its two receptors (TNFR1 and TNFR2). Here, we show that the choice of life or death can be controlled by manipulation of TNFR signals. In human erythroleukemia patient myeloid progenitor stem cells (TF-1) as well as chronic myelogenous leukemia cells (K562), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes cells for apoptosis. These death-responsive cells show prolonged TNF stimulation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but no NF-κB transcriptional activity as a consequence of receptor-interacting protein degradation by caspases. Conversely, cells of a proliferative phenotype display antiapoptotic NF-κB responses that antagonize c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase stress kinase effects. These proliferative effects of TNF are apparently due to enhanced basal expression of the caspase-8/FLICE-inhibitory protein FLIP. Manipulation of the NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals switches leukemia cells from a proliferative to an apoptotic phenotype; consequently, these highly proliferative cells die rapidly. In addition, sodium salicylate mimics the death phenotype signals and causes selective destruction of leukemia cells. These findings reveal the signaling mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of human leukemia cell life/death switching. Additionally, through knowledge of the signals that control TNF life/death switching, we have identified several therapeutic targets for selectively killing these cells.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Rae, Dr Colin
Authors: Tucker, S.J., Rae, C., Littlejohn, A.F., Paul, A., and MacEwan, D.J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
Journal Name:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
ISSN:0027-8424
Published Online:24 August 2004

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