Modelling the shear-tension coupling of woven engineering fabrics

Abdiwi, F., Harrison, P. and Yu, W.R. (2013) Modelling the shear-tension coupling of woven engineering fabrics. Advances in Materials Science and Engineering, 2013(786769), (doi:10.1155/2013/786769)

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Abstract

An approach to incorporate the coupling between the shear compliance and in-plane tension of woven engineering fabrics, in finite-element-based numerical simulations, is described. The method involves the use of multiple input curves that are selectively fed into a hypoelastic constitutive model that has been developed previously for engineering fabrics. The selection process is controlled by the current value of the in-plane strain along the two fibre directions using a simple algorithm. Model parameters are determined from actual experimental data, measured using the Biaxial Bias Extension test. An iterative process involving finite element simulations of the experimental test is used to normalise the test data for use in the code. Finally, the effectiveness of the method is evaluated and shown to provide qualitatively good predictions.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Harrison, Dr Philip
Authors: Abdiwi, F., Harrison, P., and Yu, W.R.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Systems Power and Energy
Journal Name:Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
Publisher:Hindawi Publishing Corporation
ISSN:1687-8434
ISSN (Online):1687-8442
Published Online:10 February 2013
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 The Authors
First Published:First published in Advances in Materials Science and Engineering 2013:786769
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
556771Forming of tailored thermoplastic compositesPhilip HarrisonThe Royal Academy of Engineering (RAE)10177/181ENG - ENGINEERING SYSTEMS POWER & ENERGY