Association between mammalian lifespan and circadian free-running period: the circadian resonance hypothesis revisited

Wyse, C.A., Coogan, A.N., Selman, C. , Hazlerigg, D.G. and Speakman, J.R. (2010) Association between mammalian lifespan and circadian free-running period: the circadian resonance hypothesis revisited. Biology Letters, 6(5), pp. 696-698. (doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.0152)

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Abstract

Biological rhythms that oscillate with periods close to 24 h (circadian cycles) are pervasive features of mammalian physiology, facilitating entrainment to the 24 h cycle generated by the rotation of the Earth. In the absence of environmental time cues, circadian rhythms default to their endogenous period called tau, or the free-running period. This sustained circadian rhythmicity in constant conditions has been reported across the animal kingdom, a ubiquity that could imply that innate rhythmicity confers an adaptive advantage. In this study, we found that the deviation of tau from 24 h was inversely related to the lifespan in laboratory mouse strains, and in other rodent and primate species. These findings support the hypothesis that misalignment of endogenous rhythms and 24 h environmental cycles may be associated with a physiological cost that has an effect on longevity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Selman, Professor Colin and Wyse, Dr Cathy
Authors: Wyse, C.A., Coogan, A.N., Selman, C., Hazlerigg, D.G., and Speakman, J.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Biology Letters
ISSN:1744-9561
Published Online:14 April 2010

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