Personality, socio-economic status and inflammation: cross-sectional, population-based study

Millar, K. et al. (2013) Personality, socio-economic status and inflammation: cross-sectional, population-based study. PLoS ONE, 8(3), e58256. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058256) (PMID:23516457) (PMCID:PMC3596406)

Millar, K. et al. (2013) Personality, socio-economic status and inflammation: cross-sectional, population-based study. PLoS ONE, 8(3), e58256. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058256) (PMID:23516457) (PMCID:PMC3596406)

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Abstract

<p>Background: Associations between socio-economic status (SES), personality and inflammation were examined to determine whether low SES subjects scoring high on neuroticism or hostility might suffer relatively higher levels of inflammation than affluent subjects.</p> <p>Methods: In a cross-sectional design, 666 subjects were recruited from areas of high (most deprived – “MD”) and low (least deprived – “LD”) deprivation. IL-6, ICAM-1, CRP and fibrinogen were measured along with demographic and health-behaviour variables, and personality traits of neuroticism, extraversion and psychoticism (hostility). Regression models assessed the prediction of inflammation as a function of personality, deprivation and their interaction.</p> <p>Results: Levels of CRP and IL-6 were an increasing function of neuroticism and extraversion only in LD subjects opposite trends were seen in MD subjects. The result was ascribed parsimoniously to an inflammatory ceiling effect or, more speculatively, to SES-related health-behaviour differences. Psychoticism was strongly associated with ICAM-1 in both MD and LD subjects.</p> <p>Conclusions: The association between neuroticism, CRP and IL-6 may be reduced in MD subjects confirming speculation that the association differs across population sub-groups. The association between psychoticism and ICAM-1 supports evidence that hostility has adverse effects upon the endothelium, with consequences for cardiovascular health. Health interventions may be more effective by accounting for personality-related effects upon biological processes.</p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McConnachie, Dr Alex and Ford, Professor Ian and Tannahill, Dr Carol and Shiels, Professor Paul and Cavanagh, Professor Jonathan and Millar, Professor Keith and McLean, Dr Jennifer and Packard, Professor Chris and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Lloyd, Miss Suzanne
Authors: Millar, K., Lloyd, S.M., McLean, J.S., Batty, G., Burns, H., Cavanagh, J., Deans, K.A., Ford, I., McConnachie, A., McGinty, A., Mõttus, R., Packard, C.J., Sattar, N., Shiels, P.G., Velupillai, Y.M., and Tannahill, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:PLoS ONE
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
Published Online:13 March 2013
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 The Authors
First Published:First published in PLoS ONE 8(3):e58256
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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