Cross-sectional study of ethnic differences in the utility of area deprivation measures to target socioeconomically deprived individuals

Baker, J., Mitchell, R. and Pell, J. (2013) Cross-sectional study of ethnic differences in the utility of area deprivation measures to target socioeconomically deprived individuals. Social Science and Medicine, 85, pp. 27-31. (doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.02.025)

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Abstract

Area deprivation measures provide a pragmatic tool for targeting public health interventions at socioeconomically deprived individuals. Ethnic minority groups in the UK experience higher levels of socioeconomic deprivation and certain associated diseases than the White population. The aim of this study was to explore ethnic differences in the utility of area deprivation measures as a tool for targeting socioeconomically deprived individuals. We carried out a cross-sectional study using the Health Survey for England 2004. 7,208 participants aged 16-64 years from the four largest ethnic groups in England (White, Indian, Pakistani and Black Caribbean) were included. The main outcome measures were percentage agreement, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of area deprivation, measured using Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004, in relation to individual socioeconomic position (measured by education, occupation, income, housing tenure and car access). We found that levels of both area and individual deprivation were higher in the Pakistani and Black Caribbean groups compared to the White group. Across all measures, agreement was lower in the Pakistani (50.9-63.4%) and Black Caribbean (61.0-70.1%) groups than the White (67.2-82.4%) group. However, sensitivity was higher in the Pakistani (0.56-0.64) and Black Caribbean (0.59-0.66) groups compared to the White group (0.24-0.38) and PPV was at least as high. The results for the Indian group were intermediate. We conclude that, in spite of lower agreement, area deprivation is better at identifying individual deprivation in ethnic minority groups. There was no evidence that area based targeting of public health interventions will disadvantage ethnic minority groups.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Social Science and Medicine. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Social Science and Medicine 2013. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.02.025
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mitchell, Professor Richard and Baker, Dr Jessica and Pell, Professor Jill
Authors: Baker, J., Mitchell, R., and Pell, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Social Science and Medicine
Publisher:Elsevier Ltd
ISSN:0277-9536
Published Online:27 February 2013
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
First Published:First published in Social Science and Medicine
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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