Potable water strategies in southern Mudug, Somalia, with special reference to the local economics of motorised borehole systems for watering nomadic livestock

Banks, D. (2008) Potable water strategies in southern Mudug, Somalia, with special reference to the local economics of motorised borehole systems for watering nomadic livestock. Hydrogeology Journal, 16(4), pp. 765-777. (doi:10.1007/s10040-007-0253-2)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

The southern Mudug region of Somalia has been without coherent national government and an international non-governmental organisation (NGO)/UN presence in recent years. Despite this, a functioning water economy can be found, with supply elements based on rainwater harvesting (berkads), shallow wells, motorised deep borehole systems and water tankering. The author argues that this is partly because groundwater has a clear economic value to villages (they can sell it to nomads) and to nomads (without it they will lose the capital that is their livestock), and because there is a revenue collection structure at motorised borehole systems. The ability to understand the economic value of water from the perspective of the user community is a key ingredient in a successful water-supply project in impoverished rural areas.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Banks, Mr David
Authors: Banks, D.
Subjects:H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
Q Science > QE Geology
T Technology > TD Environmental technology. Sanitary engineering
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Systems Power and Energy
Journal Name:Hydrogeology Journal
ISSN:1431-2174
ISSN (Online):1435-0157
Published Online:22 December 2007

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record