Archaeology among the bird droppings: what does it tell us about raptor nest-site selection?

Houston, D.C. and Nager, R.G. (2009) Archaeology among the bird droppings: what does it tell us about raptor nest-site selection? IBIS, 151(3), pp. 592-593. (doi:10.1111/j.1474-919X.2009.00940.x)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-919X.2009.00940.x

Abstract

Some fascinating questions are raised by Kurt and William Burnham and Ian Newton's findings, reported in this issue of Ibis, that 14C dating has shown some Gyrfalcon Falco rusticolus nests to have been occupied for around the past 2500 years. As the authors demonstrate, this finding could make an important contribution to our understanding of climate change in the high arctic. And stable isotope analysis also has the potential to record changes in prey selection and foraging habitat over long periods of time. Other detritus from nest-sites can also achieve this.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Nager, Dr Rudolf
Authors: Houston, D.C., and Nager, R.G.
Subjects:Q Science > QL Zoology
Q Science > QH Natural history
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Journal Name:IBIS
Publisher:Wiley, for the British Ornithologists' Union
ISSN:0019-1019
ISSN (Online):1474-919X
Published Online:08 June 2009

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