Testing a peer support intervention for people with type 2 diabetes: a pilot for a randomised controlled trial

Simmons, D., Cohn, S., Bunn, C. , Birch, K., Donald, S., Paddison, C., Ward, C., Robins, P., Prevost, A.T. and Graffy, J. (2013) Testing a peer support intervention for people with type 2 diabetes: a pilot for a randomised controlled trial. BMC Family Practice, 14(5), (doi:10.1186/1471-2296-14-5)

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Abstract

Background: People with Type 2 diabetes face various psycho-social, self-management and clinical care issues and evidence is mixed whether support from others with diabetes, ‘peer support’, can help. We now describe a 2 month pilot study of different peer support interventions.

Methods: The intervention was informed by formative evaluation using semi-structured interviews with health professionals, community support groups and observation of diabetes education and support groups. Invitations to participate were mailed from 4 general practices and included a survey of barriers to care. Participants were randomized by practice to receive individual, group, combined (both individual and group) or no peer support. Evaluation included ethnographic observation, semi-structured interviews and questionnaires at baseline and post-intervention.

Results: Of 1,101 invited, 15% expressed an interest in participating in the pilot. Sufficient numbers volunteered to become peer supporters, although 50% of these (8/16) withdrew. Those in the pilot were similar to other patients, but were less likely to feel they knew enough about diabetes (60.8% vs 44.6% p=0.035) and less likely to be happy with the diabetes education/care to date (75.4% vs 55.4% p=0.013). Key issues identified were the need to recruit peer supporters directly rather than through clinicians, to address participant diabetes educational needs early and the potential for group sessions to have lower participation rates than 1:1 sessions.

Conclusions: Recruitment to a full trial of peer support within the existing study design is feasible with some amendments. Attendance is a key issue that will require close monitoring and additional intervention during the trial.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Bunn, Dr Christopher
Authors: Simmons, D., Cohn, S., Bunn, C., Birch, K., Donald, S., Paddison, C., Ward, C., Robins, P., Prevost, A.T., and Graffy, J.
Subjects:H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences
Journal Name:BMC Family Practice
Publisher:Biomed Central
ISSN:1471-2296
Published Online:08 January 2013
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMC Family Practice 14:5
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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