Parent–infant vocalisations at 12 months predict psychopathology at 7 years

Allely, C.S., Purves, D., McConnachie, A. , Marwick, H., Johnson, P.C.D. , Doolin, O., Puckering, C., Golding, J., Gillberg, C. and Wilson, P. (2013) Parent–infant vocalisations at 12 months predict psychopathology at 7 years. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(3), pp. 985-993. (doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2012.11.024)

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Abstract

This study investigated the utility of adult and infant vocalisation in the prediction of child psychopathology. Families were sampled from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. Vocalisation patterns were obtained from 180 videos (60 cases and 120 randomly selected sex-matched controls) of parent–infant interactions when infants were one year old. Cases were infants who had been subsequently diagnosed aged seven years, with at least one psychiatric diagnostic categorisation using the Development and Wellbeing Assessment. Psychopathologies included in the case group were disruptive behaviour disorders, oppositional-conduct disorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, pervasive development disorder, and emotional disorders. Associations between infant and parent vocalisations and later psychiatric diagnoses were investigated. Low frequencies of maternal vocalisation predicted later development of infant psychopathology. A reduction of five vocalisations per minute predicted a 44% (95%CI: 11–94%; p-value = 0.006) increase in the odds of an infant being a case. No association was observed between infant vocalisations and overall case status. In sum, altered vocalisation frequency in mother–infant interactions at one year is a potential risk marker for later diagnosis of a range of child psychopathologies.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Research in Developmental Disabilities. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Research in Developmental Disabilities 34(3), 2012, doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2012.11.024.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McConnachie, Dr Alex and Johnson, Dr Paul and Allely, Dr Clare and Doolin, Ms Orla and Purves, Mr David and Gillberg, Professor Christopher and Puckering, Dr Christine
Authors: Allely, C.S., Purves, D., McConnachie, A., Marwick, H., Johnson, P.C.D., Doolin, O., Puckering, C., Golding, J., Gillberg, C., and Wilson, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Journal Name:Research in Developmental Disabilities
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0891-4222
ISSN (Online):1873-3379
Published Online:03 January 2013
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd
First Published:First published in Research in Developmental Disabilities 34(3):985-993
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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