Can behaviour during immunisation be used to identify attachment patterns? A feasibility study

Pritchett, R., Minnis, H. , Puckering, C., Rajendran, G. and Wilson, P. (2013) Can behaviour during immunisation be used to identify attachment patterns? A feasibility study. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50(3), pp. 386-391. (doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.09.003)

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Abstract

<b>Background</b> Infant attachment is a strong predictor of mental health, and current measures involve placing children into a stressful situation in order to observe how the child uses their primary caregiver to assuage their distress.<p></p> <b>Objectives</b> This study aimed to explore observational correlates of attachment patterns during immunisation.<p></p> <b>Participants and setting</b> 18 parent–child pairs were included in the study. They were all recruited through a single general medical practice.<p></p> <b>Methods</b> Infant immunisation videos were observed and coded for parenting behaviours as well as pain promoting and pain reducing strategies. Results were compared between different attachment groups, as measured with the Manchester Child Attachment Story Task. <p></p> <b>Results</b> Parents of securely attached children scored higher on positive Mellow Parenting Observational System behaviours, but not at a statistically significant level. Parents of securely attached children were also significantly more likely to engage in pain reducing behaviours (p <0.01) than parents of insecurely attached children.<p></p> <b>Conclusions</b> Robust composite measures for attachment informative behaviours in the immunisation situation should be developed and tested in a fully powered study.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Nursing Studies. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50.3 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.09.003.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Wilson, Dr Philip and Minnis, Professor Helen and Pritchett, Miss Rachel and Puckering, Dr Christine
Authors: Pritchett, R., Minnis, H., Puckering, C., Rajendran, G., and Wilson, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Journal Name:International Journal of Nursing Studies
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0020-7489
ISSN (Online):1873-491X
Published Online:04 September 2012
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 Elsevier
First Published:First published in International Journal of Nursing Studies 50(3):386-391
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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