At the origins of constitutional review: Sieyes' constitutional jury and the taming of constituent power

Goldoni, M. (2012) At the origins of constitutional review: Sieyes' constitutional jury and the taming of constituent power. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, 32(2), pp. 211-234. (doi: 10.1093/ojls/gqr034)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ojls/gqr034

Abstract

Even though he is mainly known for his concept of constituent power, Sieyès was one of the first constitutional theorists to ask for a guardian of the constitution which closely resembles contemporary constitutional courts. This article reconstructs the main tenets of his proposal, puts them in the larger context of his constitutional theory and then assesses the constitutional nature and functions of this institution. The judgment is mixed: as an organ, Sieyès’ constitutional jury is a hybrid institution, neither a real third chamber nor a full-fledged constitutional court; however, its functions not only are a clear anticipation of the control of constitutionality, but are also intended to tame constituent power and to protect the rights of man in case of legal gaps.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Goldoni, Dr Marco
Authors: Goldoni, M.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Law
Journal Name:Oxford Journal of Legal Studies
ISSN:0143-6503
ISSN (Online):1464-3820
Published Online:04 February 2012

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