Detection of visual events along the apparent motion trace in patients with paranoid schizophrenia

Sanders, L.L.O., Muckli, L. , de Millas, W., Lautenschlager, M., Heinz, A., Kathmann, N. and Sterzer, P. (2012) Detection of visual events along the apparent motion trace in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research, 198(2), pp. 216-223. (doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2012.03.006) (PMID:22546415)

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Abstract

Dysfunctional prediction in sensory processing has been suggested as a possible causal mechanism in the development of delusions in patients with schizophrenia. Previous studies in healthy subjects have shown that while the perception of apparent motion can mask visual events along the illusory motion trace, such motion masking is reduced when events are spatio-temporally compatible with the illusion, and, therefore, predictable. Here we tested the hypothesis that this specific detection advantage for predictable target stimuli on the apparent motion trace is reduced in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Our data show that, although target detection along the illusory motion trace is generally impaired, both patients and healthy control participants detect predictable targets more often than unpredictable targets. Patients had a stronger motion masking effect when compared to controls. However, patients showed the same advantage in the detection of predictable targets as healthy control subjects. Our findings reveal stronger motion masking but intact prediction of visual events along the apparent motion trace in patients with paranoid schizophrenia and suggest that the sensory prediction mechanism underlying apparent motion is not impaired in paranoid schizophrenia.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Muckli, Professor Lars
Authors: Sanders, L.L.O., Muckli, L., de Millas, W., Lautenschlager, M., Heinz, A., Kathmann, N., and Sterzer, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Psychiatry Research
ISSN:0165-1781
ISSN (Online):1872-7123
Published Online:28 April 2012

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
474481Brain processes predicting forthcoming perception - cortical feedback and visual predictionsLars MuckliBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/G005044/1INP - CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE NEUROIMAGING