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Sex Differences in Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Deaths in the Scottish MONICA Population of Glasgow 1985 to 1991: Presentation, Diagnosis, Treatment, and 28-Day Case Fatality of 3991 Events in Men and 1551 Events in Women

Tunstall-Pedoe, H., Morrison, C., Woodward, M., Fitzpatrick, B., and Watt, G. (1996) Sex Differences in Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Deaths in the Scottish MONICA Population of Glasgow 1985 to 1991: Presentation, Diagnosis, Treatment, and 28-Day Case Fatality of 3991 Events in Men and 1551 Events in Women. Circulation, 93 (1). pp. 1981-1992. ISSN 0009-7322 (doi:10.1161/01.CIR.93.11.1981 )

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Abstract

Scottish MONICA used medical and medico-legal records and World Health Organization MONICA Project criteria to register coronary events in 25- to 64-year-old residents of the high-incidence area of north Glasgow from 1985 to 1991.
METHODS AND RESULTS:
Age-standardized data from 3991 episodes of nonfatal definite myocardial infarction and coronary deaths in men (mean age, 55.5 years) were compared with 1551 in women (57.0 years). Many results, such as the overall 28-day fatality rates of 49.8% in men and 48.5% in women, showed insignificant differences. However, 74.3% of deaths in men occurred out of hospital versus 67.8% in women (P = .0004). After admission to hospital, fatality rates in women were 14% higher (P = .07) and after admission to coronary care, 22% higher (P = .04). Women were more often widowed. Fewer had a history of previous myocardial infarction, but the prevalence of angina pectoris, of smoking, and of chest pain in the attack was the same as in men; more had shock, syncope, and breathlessness. More consulted a doctor before admission to hospital, which delayed their coming under care. More men had ECG Q-wave progression, and more women had smaller ECG changes. This, and marginally reduced chances of direct admission to coronary care, of thrombolysis, of aspirin, and of beta-blockers, did not explain women's excess hospital fatality.
CONCLUSIONS:
Acute coronary events appear to be recognized and treated fairly equally in men and women 25 to 64 years old in Glasgow, so differences are small but subtle. More men die suddenly out of hospital; the reason why more women die after arrival may be because the equivalent number of men have already died outside.

Item Type:Article
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s):Fitzpatrick, Dr Bridie and Watt, Prof Graham
Authors: Tunstall-Pedoe, H., Morrison, C., Woodward, M., Fitzpatrick, B., and Watt, G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:Circulation
ISSN:0009-7322
ISSN (Online):1524-4539

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