What have birth cohort studies asked about genetic, pre- and perinatal exposures and child and adolescent onset mental health outcomes? A systematic review

Thompson, L., Kemp, J., Wilson, P., Pritchett, R., Minnis, H., Toms-Whittle, L., Puckering, C., Law, J. and Gillberg, C. (2010) What have birth cohort studies asked about genetic, pre- and perinatal exposures and child and adolescent onset mental health outcomes? A systematic review. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 19(1), pp. 1-15. (doi:10.1007/s00787-009-0045-4)

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Abstract

Increased understanding of early neurobehavioural development is needed to prevent, identify, and treat childhood psychopathology most effectively at the earliest possible stage. Prospective birth cohorts can elucidate the association of genes, environment, and their interactions with neurobehavioural development. We conducted a systematic review of the birth cohort literature. On the basis of internet searches and 6,248 peer-reviewed references, 105 longitudinal epidemiological studies were identified. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria (prospectively recruited, population-based cohort studies, including at least one assessment before the end of the perinatal period and at least one assessment of behaviour, temperament/personality, neuropsychiatric or psychiatric status before 19 years of age), and their methodologies were reviewed in full. Whilst the birth cohort studies did examine some aspects of behaviour and neurodevelopment, observations in the early months and years were rare. Furthermore, aspects of sampling method, sample size, data collection, design, and breadth and depth of measurement in some studies made research questions about neurodevelopment difficult to answer. Existing birth cohort studies have yielded limited information on how pre- and perinatal factors and early neurodevelopment relate to child psychopathology. Further epidemiological research is required with a specific focus on early neurodevelopment. Studies are needed which include the measures of early childhood psychopathology and involve long-term follow-up.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Epidemiology, Child development, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Perinatal
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Thompson, Dr Lucy and Wilson, Dr Philip and Gillberg, Professor Christopher and Minnis, Professor Helen and Pritchett, Miss Rachel
Authors: Thompson, L., Kemp, J., Wilson, P., Pritchett, R., Minnis, H., Toms-Whittle, L., Puckering, C., Law, J., and Gillberg, C.
Subjects:R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Centre for Population and Health Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1018-8827
ISSN (Online):1435-165X
Published Online:28 July 2009
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2010 Springer
First Published:First published in European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 19(1):1-15
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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