Alcohol consumption and use of acute and mental health hospital services in the West of Scotland Collaborative prospective cohort study

Hart, C.L. and Davey Smith, G. (2009) Alcohol consumption and use of acute and mental health hospital services in the West of Scotland Collaborative prospective cohort study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 63, pp. 703-707. (doi: 10.1136/jech.2008.079764)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2008.079764

Abstract

<b>Background</b>: Overconsumption of alcohol affects health. Data from men from the West of Scotland Collaborative study were analysed to see how reported alcohol wasrelated to acute and mental health hospital admissions. <b>Methods</b>: Men (N=5772) from a prospective cohort study located in 27 workplaces in West and Central Scotland were screened when aged 35-64 in 1970-3.The number of acute and mental health admissions and bed-days were calculated by alcohol category (none, 1-7,8-14, 15-21, 22-34 and 35 or more units per week) tothe end of 2005. Specific causes were coronary heartdisease (CHD), stroke, respiratory diseases and alcohol related. <b>Results</b>: Men who consumed 22 or more units per week had a 20% higher rate of acute admissions than non drinkers.The number of bed-days were higher for men drinking eight or more units and increased with consumption, with the highest category having a 58% higher rate of bed-days than non-drinkers. Non-drinkers had the highest admissions for CHD. For stroke, drinkers of 15 or more units had higher admissions and higher number of bed-days and these increased with increasing consumption. Respiratory admissions were higher for drinkers of 22 or more units and bed-days were higher for drinkers of 15 or more units. Alcohol-related admissions and number of bed-days generally increased with consumption. Mental health admissions and number of bed-days were raised for drinkers of 22 or more units with a suggestion of a J-shaped relationship. <b>Conclusion</b>: Alcohol consumption has a substantialeffect on acute and mental health admissions and bed-days.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hart, Dr Carole and Davey Smith, Professor George
Authors: Hart, C.L., and Davey Smith, G.
Subjects:R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Centre for Population and Health Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Research Group:Midspan
Journal Name:Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0143-005X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2009 BMJ Publishing Group
First Published:First published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 63:703-707
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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