GP experience of the impact of austerity on patients and general practices in very deprived areas

Blane, D. and Watt, G. (2012) GP experience of the impact of austerity on patients and general practices in very deprived areas. Discussion Paper. University of Glasgow.

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Publisher's URL: http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_232766_en.pdf

Abstract

Concerns have been raised in several quarters about the consequences of the Government’s welfare reforms and other austerity measures, which have been implemented since October 2010. These concerns include the negative impact that cuts in benefits are having on some of society’s most vulnerable individuals and families.

GPs and primary healthcare professionals are at the frontline in responding to the needs of these people. “GPs at the Deep End” work in 100 general practices serving the most socio-economically deprived populations in Scotland. This report draws on the recent experiences of Deep End practices, as they were asked to reflect on the effects of austerity measures on patients and on patient care. Responses included general comments and individual case studies.

The report makes for grim reading. It describes the direct and indirect consequences of austerity policies on patient health and on the systems that are in place to support health and wellbeing. The case studies are a graphic illustration of the strain these systems are already under; and more importantly, the strain that the most vulnerable – the elderly living in fuel poverty or the homeless mother and her child – are experiencing right now.

Item Type:Research Reports or Papers (Discussion Paper)
Status:Published
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Blane, Dr David and Watt, Professor Graham
Authors: Blane, D., and Watt, G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Publisher:University of Glasgow

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