Bringing together emerging and endemic zoonoses surveillance: shared challenges and a common solution

Halliday, J. , Daborn, C., Auty, H., Mtema, Z., Lembo, T. , Bronsvoort, B. M. d., Handel, I., Knobel, D. , Hampson, K. and Cleaveland, S. (2012) Bringing together emerging and endemic zoonoses surveillance: shared challenges and a common solution. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 367(1604), pp. 2872-2880. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2011.0362)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2011.0362

Abstract

Early detection of disease outbreaks in human and animal populations is crucial to the effective surveillance of emerging infectious diseases. However, there are marked geographical disparities in capacity for early detection of outbreaks, which limit the effectiveness of global surveillance strategies. Linking surveillance approaches for emerging and neglected endemic zoonoses, with a renewed focus on existing disease problems in developing countries, has the potential to overcome several limitations and to achieve additional health benefits. Poor reporting is a major constraint to the surveillance of both emerging and endemic zoonoses, and several important barriers to reporting can be identified: (i) a lack of tangible benefits when reports are made; (ii) a lack of capacity to enforce regulations; (iii) poor communication among communities, institutions and sectors; and (iv) complexities of the international regulatory environment. Redirecting surveillance efforts to focus on endemic zoonoses in developing countries offers a pragmatic approach that overcomes some of these barriers and provides support in regions where surveillance capacity is currently weakest. In addition, this approach addresses immediate health and development problems, and provides an equitable and sustainable mechanism for building the culture of surveillance and the core capacities that are needed for all zoonotic pathogens, including emerging disease threats.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Lembo, Dr Tiziana and Cleaveland, Professor Sarah and Hampson, Dr Katie and Auty, Harriet and Knobel, Mr Darryn and Halliday, Dr Joanna
Authors: Halliday, J., Daborn, C., Auty, H., Mtema, Z., Lembo, T., Bronsvoort, B. M. d., Handel, I., Knobel, D., Hampson, K., and Cleaveland, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Publisher:The Royal Society
ISSN:0962-8436
ISSN (Online):1471-2970
Published Online:10 September 2012
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society
First Published:First published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 367(1604):2872-2880
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
508041Understanding how a complex intervention works: designing large-scale vaccination programsDaniel HaydonMedical Research Council (MRC)G0901135/91914RI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED
538321Rodents and bats as reservoirs of zoonoses: ecological and social determinants of human disease risk in Kenya.Sarah CleavelandMedical Research Council (MRC)G0902417RI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED