Behavioural and cognitive interventions with or without other treatments for the management of faecal incontinence in children

Brazzelli, M., Griffiths, P.V., Cody, J.D. and Tappin, D. (2011) Behavioural and cognitive interventions with or without other treatments for the management of faecal incontinence in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2011(12), (doi:10.1002/14651858.CD002240.pub4)

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Abstract

<b>BACKGROUND:</b> Faecal incontinence is a common and potentially distressing disorder of childhood.<p></p> <b>OBJECTIVES:</b> To assess the effects of behavioural and/or cognitive interventions for the management of faecal incontinence in children.<p></p> <b>SEARCH STRATEGY:</b> We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 1 February 2006).<p></p> <b>SELECTION CRITERIA:</b> Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of behavioural and/or cognitive interventions with or without other treatments for the management of faecal incontinence in children.<p></p> <b>DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:</b> Reviewers selected studies from the literature, assessed study quality, and extracted data. Data were combined in a meta-analysis when appropriate.<p></p> <b>MAIN RESULTS:</b> Eighteen randomised trials with a total of 1168 children met the inclusion criteria. Sample sizes were generally small. All studies but one investigated children with functional faecal incontinence. Interventions varied amongst trials and few outcomes were shared by trials addressing the same comparisons. Combined results of nine trials showed higher rather than lower rates of persisting symptoms of faecal incontinence up to 12 months when biofeedback was added to conventional treatment (OR 1.11 CI 95% 0.78 to 1.58). This result was consistent with that of two trials with longer follow-up (OR 1.31 CI 95% 0.80 to 2.15). In one trial the adjunct of anorectal manometry to conventional treatment did not result in higher success rates in chronically constipated children (OR 1.40 95% CI 0.72 to 2.73 at 24 months). In one small trial the adjunct of behaviour modification to laxative therapy was associated with a significant reduction in children's soiling episodes at both the three month (OR 0.14 CI 95% 0.04 to 0.51) and the 12 month assessment (OR 0.20 CI 95% 0.06 to 0.65).<p></p> <b>AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:</b> There is no evidence that biofeedback training adds any benefit to conventional treatment in the management of functional faecal incontinence in children. There was not enough evidence on which to assess the effects of biofeedback for the management of organic faecal incontinence. There is some evidence that behavioural interventions plus laxative therapy, rather than laxative therapy alone, improves continence in children with functional faecal incontinence associated with constipation.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Tappin, Professor David and Griffiths, Dr Peter
Authors: Brazzelli, M., Griffiths, P.V., Cody, J.D., and Tappin, D.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
ISSN:1469-493X
ISSN (Online):1469-493X
Published Online:07 December 2011

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