Psychological status as a function of residual scarring and facial asymmetry after surgical repair of cleft lip and palate

Millar, K., Bell, A., Bowman, A., Brown, ., Lo, T.-W., Siebert, J.P., Simmons, D. and Ayoub, A. (2013) Psychological status as a function of residual scarring and facial asymmetry after surgical repair of cleft lip and palate. Cleft Palate: Craniofacial Journal, 49(6), pp. 150-157. (doi:10.1597/10-222)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Objective: Objective measure of scarring and three-dimensional (3D) facial asymmetry after surgical correction of unilateral cleft lip (UCL) and palate unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It was hypothesized that the degree of scarring or asymmetry would be correlated with poorer psychological function. Design: In a cross-sectional design, children underwent 3D imaging of the face and completed standardized assessments of self-esteem, depression, and state and trait anxiety. Parents rated children’s adjustment with a standard scale. Setting: Glasgow Dental School, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences. Patients: Fifty-one children aged 10 years with UCLP and 43 with UCL were recruited from the cohort treated with the surgical protocol of the CLEFTSIS managed clinical network in Scotland. Methods: Objective assessment to determine the luminance and redness of the scar and facial asymmetry. Depression, anxiety, and a self-esteem assessment battery were used for the psychological analysis. Results: Cleft cases showed superior psychological adjustment when compared with normative data. Prevalence of depression matched the population norm. The visibility of the scar (luminance ratio) was significantly correlated with lower self-esteem and higher trait anxiety in UCLP children (p = .004). Similar but nonsignificant trends were seen in the UCL group. Parental ratings of poorer adjustment also correlated with greater luminance of the scar. Conclusions: The objectively defined degree of postoperative cleft scarring was associated with subclinical symptoms of anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Ayoub, Professor Ashraf and Siebert, Dr Jan and Simmons, Dr David and Bell, Dr Aileen and Bowman, Professor Adrian and Millar, Professor Keith and Brown, Dr Denise
Authors: Millar, K., Bell, A., Bowman, A., Brown, ., Lo, T.-W., Siebert, J.P., Simmons, D., and Ayoub, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Dental School
College of Science and Engineering > School of Computing Science
College of Science and Engineering > School of Mathematics and Statistics > Statistics
Journal Name:Cleft Palate: Craniofacial Journal
ISSN:1055-6656
ISSN (Online):1545-1569

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record