The work of Richard John Lloyd (1846-1906) and "the crude system of doctrine which passes at present under the name of phonetics"

MacMahon, M.K. (2007) The work of Richard John Lloyd (1846-1906) and "the crude system of doctrine which passes at present under the name of phonetics". Historiographia Linguistica, 34(2/3), pp. 281-331.

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Abstract

Richard John Lloyd (1846-1906) was a well-known Liverpool businessman who also pursued the study of phonetics, English language, literature, sociology and philosophy. His wide intellectual background embraced mathematics and physics too. His work in phonetics is characterised by a particular emphasis on the acoustics of vowel sounds, as well as by close attention to the fine detail of articulation (what he called "minute phonetics"). Alongside a small group of scientists in Europe, he was actively involved in research into the formant structure of vowels. His relatively early death meant that his work never achieved the prominence it deserved, and hence his influence has remained negligible. His work, however, bears comparison with that of colleagues in articulatory and experimental phonetics later in the 20th century.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MacMahon, Professor Mike
Authors: MacMahon, M.K.
Subjects:P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
College/School:College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > English Language and Linguistics
Journal Name:Historiographia Linguistica
ISSN:0302-5160

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