'The highest flights of circumlocutory art': Britain, Latvia and recognizing the Soviet annexation of 1940

Swain, G. (2012) 'The highest flights of circumlocutory art': Britain, Latvia and recognizing the Soviet annexation of 1940. Journal of Baltic Studies, 43(3), pp. 345-362. (doi:10.1080/01629778.2011.646095)

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Abstract

The British Government never recognized the Soviet annexation of the Baltic States in June 1940, but almost did so early in 1942 and was ready to do so again in 1944, when it took at face value Stalin's revision of the Soviet constitution. The result was 'trouble' from the Baltic ambassadors in London, particularly the Latvian ambassador. The British Government changed its stance in autumn 1945 when the revisions to the Soviet constitution proved to be sham. Thereafter British policy amounted to procrastination, as the developing Cold War prevented a final post-war settlement.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Swain, Professor Geoffrey
Authors: Swain, G.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Central and East European Studies
Journal Name:Journal of Baltic Studies
ISSN:0162-9778
ISSN (Online):1751-7877
Published Online:20 December 2011

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