Albumin concentrations are primarily determined by the body cell mass and the systemic inflammatory response in cancer patients with weight loss

McMillan, D.C., Watson, W.S., O'Gorman, P., Preston, T., Scott, H.R. and McArdle, C.S. (2001) Albumin concentrations are primarily determined by the body cell mass and the systemic inflammatory response in cancer patients with weight loss. Nutrition and Cancer, 39(2), pp. 210-213. (doi:10.1207/S15327914nc392_8)

McMillan, D.C., Watson, W.S., O'Gorman, P., Preston, T., Scott, H.R. and McArdle, C.S. (2001) Albumin concentrations are primarily determined by the body cell mass and the systemic inflammatory response in cancer patients with weight loss. Nutrition and Cancer, 39(2), pp. 210-213. (doi:10.1207/S15327914nc392_8)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15327914nc392_8

Abstract

The association between hypoalbuminemia and poor prognosis in patients with cancer is well recognized. However, the factors that contribute to the fall in albumin concentrations are not well understood. In the present study, we examined the relationship between circulating albumin concentrations, weight loss, the body cell mass (measured using total body potassium), and the presence of an inflammatory response (measured using C- reactive protein) in male patients (n=40) with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. Albumin concentrations were significantly correlated with the percent ideal body weight (r=0.390, p lt 0.05), extent of reported weight loss (r=-0.492, p lt 0.01), percent predicted total body potassium (adjusted for age, height, and weight, r=0.686, p lt 0.001), and logo C-reactive protein concentrations (r=-0.545, p lt 0.001). On multiple regression analysis, the percent predicted total body potassium and log(10) C-reactive protein concentrations accounted for 63% of the variation in albumin concentrations (r(2) = 0.626, p lt 0.001). The interrelationship between albumin, body cell mass, and the inflammatory response is consistent with the concept that the presence of an ongoing inflammatory response contributes to the progressive loss of these vital protein components of the body and the subsequent death of patients with advanced cancer.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Preston, Professor Thomas
Authors: McMillan, D.C., Watson, W.S., O'Gorman, P., Preston, T., Scott, H.R., and McArdle, C.S.
Subjects:R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
Journal Name:Nutrition and Cancer
Publisher:Routledge
ISSN:0163-5581
Copyright Holders:© 2004 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
First Published:First published in Nutrition and Cancer-An International Journal39(2):210-213
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For permission to use or reprint please contact LEA

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