First evidence that parasite infecting apparent aparasitemic serological suspects in human African trypanosomiasis are Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and are similar to those found in patients

Kaboré, J., Koffi, M., Bucheton, B., MacLeod, A. , Duffy, C., Ilboudo, H., Camara, M., De Meeûs, T., Belem, A.M.G. and Jamonneau, V. (2011) First evidence that parasite infecting apparent aparasitemic serological suspects in human African trypanosomiasis are Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and are similar to those found in patients. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 11(6), pp. 1250-1255. (doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2011.04.014)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Thanks to its sensitivity and its ease of use in the field, the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT) is widely used for serological screening of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Positive subjects are then examined by microscopy to confirm the disease. However, the CATT exhibits false-positive results raising the question of whether CATT-positive subjects who are not confirmed by microscopic detection of trypanosomes (SERO) are truly exposed to T.b. gambiense infection. For this purpose, we applied microsatellite genotyping on DNA extracted from blood of both HAT confirmed patients and SERO subjects in Guinea and Côte d'Ivoire since microsatellite genotyping has proved useful for the study of T.b. gambiense genetic diversity. Problems of amplification failures raise the question of the sensitivity of microsatellite markers when applied on biological samples especially from SERO subjects for who low blood parasitaemia are suspected. Nevertheless, we have shown that the trypanosomes from SERO individuals that have been genotyped belong to T.b. gambiense group 1 and were identical to those found in HAT patients. These results constitute the first evidences that at least some SERO are indeed infected by T.b. gambiense group 1 and that they may constitute a human reservoir of parasite in HAT foci. Whether these individuals should undergo treatment remains an open question as long as their role in HAT transmission is unknown. Our results strongly recommend the follow-up of such subjects to improve control strategies.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MacLeod, Professor Annette
Authors: Kaboré, J., Koffi, M., Bucheton, B., MacLeod, A., Duffy, C., Ilboudo, H., Camara, M., De Meeûs, T., Belem, A.M.G., and Jamonneau, V.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Infection, Genetics and Evolution
Journal Abbr.:Infec. Genet. Evol.
ISSN:1567-1348
Published Online:17 April 2011

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record