School nurses' experiences of delivering the UK HPV vaccination programme in its first year

Hilton, S. , Hunt, K. , Bedford, H. and Petticrew, M. (2011) School nurses' experiences of delivering the UK HPV vaccination programme in its first year. BMC Infectious Diseases, 11(226), (doi:10.1186/1471-2334-11-226)

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Abstract

Background: In the United Kingdom (UK) in September 2008, school nurses began delivering the HPV immunisation programme for girls aged 12 and 13 years old. This study offers insights from school nurses' perspectives and experiences of delivering this new vaccination programme. Methods: Thirty in-depth telephone interviews were conducted with school nurses working across the UK between September 2008 and May 2009. This time period covers the first year of the HPV vaccination programme in schools. School nurses were recruited via GP practices, the internet and posters targeted at school nurse practitioners. Results: All the school nurses spoke of readying themselves for a deluge of phone calls from concerned parents, but found that in fact few parents telephoned to ask for more information or express their concerns about the HPV vaccine. Several school nurses mentioned a lack of planning by policy makers and stated that at its introduction they felt ill prepared. The impact on school nurses' workload was spoken about at length by all the school nurses. They believed that the programme had vastly increased their workload leading them to cut back on their core activities and the time they could dedicate to offering support to vulnerable pupils. Conclusion: Overall the first year of the implementation of the HPV vaccination programme in the UK has exceeded school nurses' expectations and some of its success may be attributed to the school nurses' commitment to the programme. It is also the case that other factors, including positive newsprint media reporting that accompanied the introduction of the HPV vaccination programme may have played a role. Nevertheless, school nurses also believed that the programme had vastly increased their workload leading them to cut back on their core activities and as such they could no longer dedicate time to offer support to vulnerable pupils. This unintentional aspect of the programme may be worthy of further exploration

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hunt, Professor Kate and Petticrew, Dr Mark and Hilton, Professor Shona
Authors: Hilton, S., Hunt, K., Bedford, H., and Petticrew, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:BMC Infectious Diseases
ISSN:1471-2334
ISSN (Online):1471-2334
Published Online:24 August 2011
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2011 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMC Infectious Diseases 11:226
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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