The syringe driver and the subcutaneous route in palliative care: the inventor, the history and the implications

Graham, F. and Clark, D. (2005) The syringe driver and the subcutaneous route in palliative care: the inventor, the history and the implications. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 29(1), pp. 32-40. (doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2004.08.006)

Graham, F. and Clark, D. (2005) The syringe driver and the subcutaneous route in palliative care: the inventor, the history and the implications. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 29(1), pp. 32-40. (doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2004.08.006)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, the syringe driver has become a commonly used technology in British palliative care, used to administer continuous subcutaneous infusions (CSCI) for symptom management. Although the device itself has not been adopted universally, it has stimulated interest in the use of CSCI in palliative care and played a significant role in the modern history of this approach. This historical case study of the syringe driver examines the life and work of its inventor, explores its development for use in childhood thalassemia, and analyzes the circumstances surrounding its adoption in palliative care. We conclude by considering the reasons for the continued popularity of the syringe driver, despite problems in its use, and reflect on the lessons which can be learned about the use of CSCI in palliative care internationally.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Clark, Professor David
Authors: Graham, F., and Clark, D.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Interdisciplinary Studies
Journal Name:Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Publisher:Elsevier Inc.
ISSN:1873-6513
ISSN (Online):0885-3924
Published Online:13 January 2005

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record