Climate change and the duties of the disadvantaged: reply to Caney

Knight, C. (2011) Climate change and the duties of the disadvantaged: reply to Caney. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, 14(4), pp. 531-542. (doi:10.1080/13698230.2011.597244)

Knight, C. (2011) Climate change and the duties of the disadvantaged: reply to Caney. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, 14(4), pp. 531-542. (doi:10.1080/13698230.2011.597244)

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Abstract

Discussions of where the costs of climate change adaptation and mitigation should fall often focus on the ‘polluter pays principle’ or the ‘ability to pay principle’. Simon Caney has recently defended a ‘hybrid view’, which includes versions of both of these principles. This article argues that Caney’s view succeeds in overcoming several shortfalls of both principles, but is nevertheless subject to three important objections: first, it does not distinguish between those emissions which are hard to avoid and those which are easy to avoid; second, its only partial reference to all-things-considered justice means it cannot provide a full account even of climate justice; and third, it assigns to the poor very limited duties to meet climate change costs, even where they have created those costs, which may incentivise them to increase emissions. An alternative pluralistic account which avoids these objections is presented.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Knight, Dr Carl
Authors: Knight, C.
Subjects:B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BJ Ethics
J Political Science > JC Political theory
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Politics
Research Group:Social and International Theory
Journal Name:Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy
Publisher:Taylor and Francis
ISSN:1369-8230
ISSN (Online):1743-8772
Published Online:23 August 2011
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2011 Routledge
First Published:First published in Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14(4):531-542
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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