Human host determinants influencing the outcome of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections

Bucheton, B., MacLeod, A. and Jamonneau, V. (2011) Human host determinants influencing the outcome of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections. Parasite Immunology, 33(8), pp. 438-447. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-3024.2011.01287.x)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3024.2011.01287.x

Abstract

Since first identified, human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness has been described as invariably fatal. Increasing data however argue that infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT, results in a wide range of outcomes in its human host and importantly that a number of subjects in endemic areas are apparently able to control infection to low levels, undetectable by the classical parasitological tests used in the field. Thus, trypanotolerance seems to occur in humans as has already been described in cattle or in the rodent experimental models of infection. This review focuses on the description of the diversity of outcomes resulting from T. b. gambiense in humans and on the host factors involved. The consequences/impacts on HAT epidemiology resulting from this diversity are also discussed with regard to implementing sustainable HAT control strategies

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MacLeod, Professor Annette
Authors: Bucheton, B., MacLeod, A., and Jamonneau, V.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Parasite Immunology
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:0141-9838
ISSN (Online):1365-3024

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