Rhythmic TMS causes local entrainment of natural oscillatory signatures

Thut, G., Veniero, D., Romei, V., Miniussi, C., Schyns, P. and Gross, J. (2011) Rhythmic TMS causes local entrainment of natural oscillatory signatures. Current Biology, 21(14), pp. 1176-1185. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2011.05.049)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

BACKGROUNDNeuronal elements underlying perception, cognition, and action exhibit distinct oscillatory phenomena, measured in humans by electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). So far, the correlative or causal nature of the link between brain oscillations and functions has remained elusive. A compelling demonstration of causality would primarily generate oscillatory signatures that are known to correlate with particular cognitive functions and then assess the behavioral consequences. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for causal entrainment of brain oscillations by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) using concurrent EEG. RESULTS: We used rhythmic TMS bursts to directly interact with an MEG-identified parietal α-oscillator, activated by attention and linked to perception. With TMS bursts tuned to its preferred α-frequency (α-TMS), we confirmed the three main predictions of entrainment of a natural oscillator: (1) that α-oscillations are induced during α-TMS (reproducing an oscillatory signature of the stimulated parietal cortex), (2) that there is progressive enhancement of this α-activity (synchronizing the targeted, α-generator to the α-TMS train), and (3) that this depends on the pre-TMS phase of the background α-rhythm (entrainment of natural, ongoing α-oscillations). Control conditions testing different TMS burst profiles and TMS-EEG in a phantom head confirmed specificity of α-boosting to the case of synchronization between TMS train and neural oscillator. CONCLUSIONS: The periodic electromagnetic force that is generated during rhythmic TMS can cause local entrainment of natural brain oscillations, emulating oscillatory signatures activated by cognitive tasks. This reveals a new mechanism of online TMS action on brain activity and can account for frequency-specific behavioral TMS effects at the level of biologically relevant rhythms

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Schyns, Professor Philippe and Thut, Professor Gregor and Gross, Professor Joachim
Authors: Thut, G., Veniero, D., Romei, V., Miniussi, C., Schyns, P., and Gross, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Current Biology
ISSN:0960-9822
ISSN (Online):1879-0445
Published Online:30 June 2011
Related URLs:

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record