Exercise training has greater effects on insulin sensitivity in daughters of patients with type 2 diabetes than in women with no family history of diabetes

Barwell, N.D., Malkova, D. , Moran, C.N., Cleland, S.J., Packard, C.J., Zammit, V.A. and Gill, J.M.R. (2008) Exercise training has greater effects on insulin sensitivity in daughters of patients with type 2 diabetes than in women with no family history of diabetes. Diabetologia, 51(10), pp. 1912-1919. (doi:10.1007/s00125-008-1097-6)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-008-1097-6

Abstract

<i>Aims/hypothesis</i> Sedentary offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes are often more insulin-resistant than persons with no family history of diabetes, but when active or fit offspring of type 2 diabetic patients are compared with non-diabetic persons, differences in insulin resistance are less evident. This study aimed to determine the effects of an exercise training intervention on insulin sensitivity in both groups. <i>Methods</i> Women offspring (n=34) of type 2 diabetic patients (offspring age 35.6 ± 7.0 years, BMI 28.1 ± 5.1 kg/m<sup>2</sup>) and 36 matched female controls (age 33.6 ± 6.1 years, BMI 27.3 ± 4.7 kg/m<sup>2</sup>) participated. Body composition, fitness and metabolic measurements were made at baseline and after a controlled 7 week exercise intervention. <i>Results</i> At baseline, insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was 22% lower in offspring than controls (p < 0.05), despite similar body fat and maximal oxygen uptake (VO<sub>2max</sub>) values in the two groups. ISI increased by 23% (p < 0.05) in offspring following the exercise intervention, compared with 7% (NS) in the controls. Increases in VO<sub>2max</sub> were similar in both groups (controls 12%, offspring 15% , p < 0.05 for both). Plasma leptin concentrations decreased significantly in the offspring (-24%, p < 0.01) but not in controls (0%, NS). Change in ISI correlated significantly with baseline ISI (r=-0.47, p < 0.0005) and change in leptin (r=-0.43, p < 0.0005). The latter relationship was not attenuated by adjustment for changes in body fat. <i>Conclusions/interpretation</i> Offspring, but not controls, significantly increased ISI in response to an exercise intervention, indicating that insulin sensitivity is more highly modulated by physical activity in daughters of patients with type 2 diabetes than in women with no family history of the disease

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Diabetes family history - Exercise - Insulin resistance - Insulin sensitivity - Leptin - Offspring - Training - Women
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Malkova, Dr Dale and Gill, Professor Jason and Cleland, Dr Stephen
Authors: Barwell, N.D., Malkova, D., Moran, C.N., Cleland, S.J., Packard, C.J., Zammit, V.A., and Gill, J.M.R.
Subjects:R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:Diabetologia
ISSN:0012-186X
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