Urban domestic dog populations as a source of canine distemper virus for wild carnivores in the Coquimbo region of Chile

Acosta-Jamett, G., Chalmers, W.S.K., Cunningham, A.A., Cleaveland, S. , Handel, I.G. and Bronsvoort, B.M.d. (2011) Urban domestic dog populations as a source of canine distemper virus for wild carnivores in the Coquimbo region of Chile. Veterinary Microbiology, 152(3-4), pp. 247-257. (doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2011.05.008)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2011.05.008

Abstract

Urban areas can support dog populations dense enough to maintain canine distemper virus (CDV) and can be a source of infection for rural dogs and free-ranging carnivores. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between urban and rural domestic dog and wild carnivore populations and their effects on the epidemiology of CDV to explain retrospectively a CD outbreak in wild foxes in 2003. From 2005 to 2007 a cross-sectional household questionnaire survey was conducted in Coquimbo and Ovalle cities, in three towns and in rural sites along two transects from these cities to the Fray Jorge National Park (FJNP) in the Coquimbo region, Chile. Blood samples were collected from unvaccinated dogs at surveyed households and from free-ranging foxes in rural areas along the transects. The seroprevalence of CDV in domestic dogs was higher in urban than in rural areas and in the later was highest in dogs born before 2001-2002. The seroprevalence of CDV in foxes was higher in areas closer to human settlements. A high seroprevalence in dogs born before 2001-2002 further supports a link between CDV patterns in rural dog and fox populations. In our study area, urban dogs are proposed to be the source of CDV infection to wild carnivores. The large dog population size and density detected in Coquimbo and Ovalle provides optimal conditions for maintaining a large and dense susceptible population of dogs, which can act as a reservoir for highly infectious diseases and could have been the source of infection in the CD outbreak in wild foxes

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cleaveland, Professor Sarah
Authors: Acosta-Jamett, G., Chalmers, W.S.K., Cunningham, A.A., Cleaveland, S., Handel, I.G., and Bronsvoort, B.M.d.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Veterinary Microbiology
ISSN:0378-1135

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