Relationship between emergency presentation, systemic inflammatory response, and cancer-specific survival in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for colon cancer

Crozier, J.E., Leitch, E.F., McKee, R.F., Anderson, J.H., Horgan, P.G. and McMillan, D.C. (2009) Relationship between emergency presentation, systemic inflammatory response, and cancer-specific survival in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for colon cancer. American Journal of Surgery, 197(4), pp. 544-549. (doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.12.052)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.12.052

Abstract

Background Emergency presentation is recognized to be associated with poorer cancer-specific survival following curative resection for colorectal cancer. The present study examined the hypothesis that an enhanced systemic inflammatory response, prior to surgery, might explain the impact of emergency presentation on survival. Methods In all, 188 patients undergoing potentially curative resection for colorectal cancer were studied. Of these, 55 (29%) presented as emergencies. The systemic inflammatory response was assessed using the Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), which is the combination of an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (<35 g/L). Results In the emergency group, tumor stage was greater (P < 0.01), more patients received adjuvant therapy (P < 0.01) more patients had an elevated mGPS (P < 0.01), and more patients died of their disease (P < 0.05). The minimum follow-up was 12 months; the median follow-up of the survivors was 48 months. Emergency presentation was associated with poorer 3-year cancer-specific survival in those patients aged 65 to 74 years (P < 0.01), in both males and females (P < 0.05), in the deprived (P < 0.01), in patients with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage II disease (P < 0.01), in those who received no adjuvant therapy (P < 0.01), and in the mGPS 0 and 1 groups (P < 0.05) groups. On multivariate survival analysis of patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for TNM stage II colon cancer, emergency presentation (P < 0.05) and mGPS (P < 0.05) were independently associated with cancer-specific survival. Conclusions These results suggest that emergency presentation and the presence of systemic inflammatory response prior to surgery are linked and account for poorer cancer-specific survival in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for colon cancer. Both emergency presentation and an elevated mGPS should be taken into account when assessing the likely outcome of these patients.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMillan, Professor Donald
Authors: Crozier, J.E., Leitch, E.F., McKee, R.F., Anderson, J.H., Horgan, P.G., and McMillan, D.C.
Subjects:R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RD Surgery
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:American Journal of Surgery
Journal Abbr.:Am. J. Surg.
ISSN:0002-9610
Published Online:10 July 2008
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2009 Elsevier
First Published:First published in Journal of American Surgery 197(4):544-549
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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