Identification of bacteria associated with feline chronic gingivostomatitis using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

Dolieslager, S.M.J., Riggio, M.P. , Lennon, A., Lappin, D.F., Johnston, N., Taylor, D. and Bennett, D. (2011) Identification of bacteria associated with feline chronic gingivostomatitis using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Veterinary Microbiology, 148(1), pp. 93-98. (doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2010.08.002)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2010.08.002

Abstract

Feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral cavity that causes severe pain and distress. There are currently no specific treatment methods available and little is known regarding its aetiology, although bacteria are thought to play a major role. The purpose of this study was to identify the oral bacterial flora in normal and diseased cats. Oral swabs were obtained from the palatoglossal folds of eight cats (three normal and five FCGS) and were subjected to microbiological culture. Pasteurella pneumotropica and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida were the most prevalent species identified by culture methods in the normal and FCGS samples, respectively. Bacteria were also identified using culture-independent methods (bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing). For the normal samples, 158 clones were analysed and 85 clones were sequenced. Capnocytophaga canimorsus (10.8% of clones analysed) was the predominant species. Uncultured species accounted for 8.2% of clones analysed, and 43.7% of clones analysed represented potentially novel species. For the FCGS samples, 253 clones were analysed and 91 clones were sequenced. The predominant species was P. multocida subsp. multocida (51.8% of clones analysed). Uncultured species accounted for 8.7% of clones analysed, and 4.7% of clones analysed represented potentially novel species. It is concluded that the oral flora in cats with FCGS appears to be less diverse than that found in normal cats. However, P. multocida subsp. multocida is found to be significantly more prevalent in FCGS than in normal cats and consequently may be of aetiological significance in this disease. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Lennon, Mr Alan and Lappin, Dr David and Riggio, Dr Marcello and Taylor, Prof David and Bennett, Professor David
Authors: Dolieslager, S.M.J., Riggio, M.P., Lennon, A., Lappin, D.F., Johnston, N., Taylor, D., and Bennett, D.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Dental School
Journal Name:Veterinary Microbiology
ISSN:0378-1135

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