An open study of the effectiveness of a multi-component weight-loss intervention for adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity

Melville, C.A. et al. (2011) An open study of the effectiveness of a multi-component weight-loss intervention for adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity. British Journal of Nutrition, 105(10), pp. 1553-1562. (doi:10.1017/S0007114510005362) (PMID:21255473)

Melville, C.A. et al. (2011) An open study of the effectiveness of a multi-component weight-loss intervention for adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity. British Journal of Nutrition, 105(10), pp. 1553-1562. (doi:10.1017/S0007114510005362) (PMID:21255473)

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Abstract

Adults with intellectual disabilities experience high rates of obesity. Despite this higher risk, there is little evidence on the effectiveness of weight-loss interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity. The present study examined the effectiveness of the TAKE 5 multi-component weight-loss intervention. Adults with obesity were invited using specialist intellectual disability services to participate in the study. Obesity was defined as a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or greater. TAKE 5 included a daily energy-deficit diet of 2510 kJ (600 kcal), achieved via a personalised dietary prescription. Participants' body weight, BMI, waist circumference and levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour were measured before and after the intervention. A total of fifty-four individuals consented to participate, of which forty-seven (87 %) completed the intervention in the study period. There was a significant decrease in body weight (mean difference − 4·47 (95 % CI − 5·91, − 3·03) kg; P less than 0·0001), BMI ( − 1·82 (95 % CI − 2·36, − 1·29) kg/m2; P less than 0·0001), waist circumference ( − 6·29 (95 % CI − 7·85, − 4·73) cm; P less than 0·0001) and daily sedentary behaviour of participants ( − 41·40 (95 % CI − 62·45, − 20·35) min; P = 0·00 034). Of the participants who completed the intervention, seventeen (36·2 %) lost 5 % or more of their initial body weight. Findings from the study suggest that TAKE 5 is an effective weight-loss intervention for adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity. The effectiveness of TAKE 5 should be examined further in a controlled study.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Matthews, Dr Lynsay and Murray, Mrs Heather and Hankey, Dr Catherine and Spanos, Mr Dimitrios and Melville, Professor Craig and Macmillan, Miss Susan
Authors: Melville, C.A., Boyle, S., Miller, S., Macmillan, S., Penpraze, V., Pert, C., Spanos, D., Matthews, L., Robinson, N., Murray, H., and Hankey, C.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
Journal Name:British Journal of Nutrition
Journal Abbr.:Brit. J. Nutr.
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0007-1145
ISSN (Online):1475-2662
Published Online:24 January 2011

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
469991A pilot study of a weight loss intervention for adults with learning disabilities and obesityDr Craig MelvilleScottish Executive Health DepartmentCZG/2/362UNSPECIFIED